Different ways to compose a Request Body

In this post we will show you the different ways you can compose a Request Body: from the simplest to the most complex.

  1. Copy and paste the body from somewhere

    The first and easiest way is when we have a body from somewhere to copy and paste as is into the call. Let’s see how this is done:

    1. In the composer we add the POST component and type the url and all of the required fields.
      Url: https://mydomain.com/myPost (the url of the resource you want to test)
      Variable: payload (the name of the variable that contains the response)
      Mode: json (the type of the response)

      post_comp

    2. Now we add the Body component and after selecting the Content-Type we paste the body in Content field.
      Content-Type: application/json
      Content: {"method":"post","url":"http://www.testme.com/api/run/test"} (the body required in your call)

      paste_body

    3. Now we can execute the call and proceed with the test.
      final_call
  2. Using Variables in the Request Body

    Another way to compose a request is using variables in the body.

    1. In the composer we add the POST component typing the url and all the required fields.
      Url: https://mydomain.com/myPost (the url of the resource you want to test)
      Variable: payload (the name of the variable that contains the response)
      Mode: json (the type of the response)

      post_comp

    2. We add the Body component. In the Content-Type we choose the proper one, let’s say application/json. In this scenario we need to use a variable so in the Content field we enter the following:
       {
       "user": ${user},
       "password": ${password},
       "url": "http://www.testme.com/api/run/test"
       }

      In this scenario “user” and “password” are not directly passed in the body but they are variables defined as global parameters in the data set.
      var_body
      data_set

    3. The POST has been done and can be executed.
      final_call2
  3. Using a Variable from another call

    The next way to compose a Request Body is by using a variable from another call. Let’s see how this can be done.

    1. The first thing we need to do is add the call we will retrieve the variable from. Let’s consider, as example, the common scenario where we need to perform a login for authentication and retrieve the authentication token required for the following call.
      Url: http://www.mydomain.com/login (the url of the resource you want to test)
      Variable: payload (the name of the variable that contains the response)
      Mode: json (the type of the response)
      Header: 
         Name: Authorization
         Value: Basic YWRtaW46cGFzc3dvcmQ= (this value comes from encoding username:password in Base64)

      loginAuth

    2. Executing the login we will have as response the desired token. Let’s see it using our console.
      response_token
    3. Now we need to save the token as variable.
      Var: token (the name of the variable)
      Variable mode: String (the type of the variable)
      Value: ${payload.access_token} (we retrive the value from the previous 'payload')

      var_token

    4. Once the token has been saved as variable we can proceed adding the second call and use that token in the Request Body.
      Content-Type: application/json
      Content: {"token":"${token}"}

      bodyWToken

  4. Using an object from another call

    In the next example we will show you a more complex case. We will consider the scenario where we need to use an object retrieved from a previous call into the body of a subsequent call. Let’s take a look at an example:

    1. First, we perform the call we retrieve the object from.
      search
    2. Let’s execute the call in our console in order to see the response.
      {
       "id": 123,
       "items": [
       {
       "id": 11,
       "name": "stuff1"
       },
       {
       "id": 12,
       "name": "stuff2"
       },
       {
       "id": 13,
       "name": "stuff3"
       }
       ]
      }

      search_response

    3. Let’s say we need the object ‘items’ as the body in the subsequent call. So, as a second call, we will add a POST and we will type the following as body:
      ${searchPayload.items.asJSON()}

       

      objectInBody

    4. Now we can proceed with the test.

     

  5. Creating a new structure to add as a body

The last scenario is yet another more complex one. In this case, we consider the scenario where we need to create a new structure to add as a body, using data from a previous call. Let’s see how we can do this:

  1. The first thing we have to do is to perform the call which retrieves the data we’re using. Let’s consider a GET that returns an array of items.firstCall
  2. Let’s see the response using our console.
    {
     "items": [
     {
     "id": 11,
     "price": 5.99
     },
     {
     "id": 12,
     "price": 6.99
     },
     {
     "id": 13,
     "price": 10.99
     },
     {
     "id": 14,
     "price": 15.99
     }
     ]
    }

    response_get

  3. Now we need to create the new data structure. To do so, we add a SET component as follow: 
    payload.items.each { it -> it.currency='$'  }; return payload.asJSON(); (for each item in the array, we add the currency attribute with "$" as value)

    newData

  4. Now we can add the POST and add the new structure as the POST request body:postWithNewStructure
  5. That’s it. Now we can proceed with the test.allDone

Note: in this post we have used the POST method but all of the examples shown can be applied to the other REST methods. In the same way, we have demonstrated scenarios with Request Bodies, but all of the examples can be used for Header or Param cases.